Welcome!

Open Source Cloud Authors: Zakia Bouachraoui, Liz McMillan, Yeshim Deniz, Elizabeth White, Pat Romanski

Related Topics: @CloudExpo, Open Source Cloud

@CloudExpo: Blog Post

Hadoop Quickstart: Create and Better Manage Hadoop Clusters on Rackspace

Use Whirr to automate standup of your distributed cluster on Rackspace

We have previously provided a Quickstart guide to standing up Rackspace cloud servers (and have one for Amazon servers as well). These are very low cost ways of building reliable, production ready capabilities for enterprise use (commercial and government).  And Bryan Halfpap has provided a Quickstart guide which shows you how to build a Hadoop Cluster (leveraging Cloudera’s CDH3).  Using Bryan’s guide you can have a Hadoop Cluster up and running in under 20 minutes.

With this post we would like to provide you with some additional tips that flow from these other posts. We will show you how to build clusters even faster using another common tool in community use, Whirr.

What is Whirr? Apache Whirr is a set of libraries for running cloud services. Here is more from http://whirr.apache.org/

Whirr provides:

  • A cloud-neutral way to run services. You don’t have to worry about the idiosyncrasies of each provider.
  • A common service API. The details of provisioning are particular to the service.
  • Smart defaults for services. You can get a properly configured system running quickly, while still being able to override settings as needed.

And the great news is you can use Whirr as a command line tool for deploying clusters.

If you follow the tips below you can use Whirr to quickly standup distributed clusters. Our assumptions in this guide are that you have stood up RedHat severs using our Rackspace tutorial. But if this is not the case you should be able to easily modify the tips below to suit your situation.

SSH into your Rackspace account by terminal window:

sudo ssh [email protected]

After logging in, it is always a good idea to make sure you have the latest packages. In Red Hat, type:

sudo yum upgrade

Now it is time to install Whirr.  This is easy since you are running RedHat. RedHat uses YUM, a package management application that makes software installation easy. Type:

yum install whirr

Your installation will be complete in under a minute.

You will now need to generate a keypair for use with Whirr. This will let you enable secure communications with the Whirr cluster without needing passwords. To do that, enter the following command:

ssh-keygen -t rsa -P ”

You will see:

Generating public/private rsa key pair.
Enter file in which to save the key (/root/.ssh/id_rsa):

Just hit “enter”.

You will see something like:

Created directory ‘/root/.ssh’.
Your identification has been saved in /root/.ssh/id_rsa.
Your public key has been saved in /root/.ssh/id_rsa.pub.
The key fingerprint is:
c6:31:f7:f5:97:e4:8c:b3:2a:f4:0d:a0:93:e4:c1:06 [email protected]
The key’s randomart image is:
+–[ RSA 2048]—-+
| |
| E |
| o o . .. |
| * = . .=..|
| + S . .o +o|
| * . . o .|
| o . o. |
| . … |
| .. |
+—————–+

Now you must define your Whirr cluster. you do that by creating a properties file. For simplicity, you will name it hadoop.properties. You will need your rackspace username and API to fill out the whirr properties file.  Your API is found in my account page under “API Access”

You can create the properties file many ways. Here is how to do it in nano:

nano hadoop.properties

Now  enter the following info in that file, subsituting your login and API info for what you see below:

whirr.cluster-name=myhadoopcluster
whirr.instance-templates=1 hadoop-jobtracker+hadoop-namenode,1 hadoop-datanode+$
whirr.provider=cloudservers-us
whirr.identity=enteryourloginidfromrackspace
whirr.credential=[youuseyourownapi]
whirr.private-key-file=/root/.ssh/id_rsa
whirr.public-key-file=/root/.ssh/id_rsa.pub
whirr.cluster-user=newusers
whirr.hadoop-install-function=install_cdh_hadoop
whirr.hadoop-configure-function=configure_cdh_hadoop

Now to launch a cluster, type:

$ whirr launch-cluster –config hadoop.properties

This will take a few moments to run. As it runs you should see messages like:

Bootstrapping cluster
Configuring template
Starting 1 node(s) with roles [hadoop-datanode]
Configuring template
Starting 1 node(s) with roles [hadoop-jobtracker, hadoop-namenode]

As things are started up, servers are being automatically built. Keep watching your e-mail, you will be getting notices of server standup. Remember, this is costing you money. When you finish using your clusters you will want to terminate them. You can do that through Whirr or by just nuking the servers using your Rackspace account and control panel.

Note the info being provided in the terminal window. Information is being provided on the instances being stood up.  As you skim this info you will notice a couple URL’s are provided that give you a web UI into the namenode and job tracker. For example, mine are:

Namenode web UI available at http://50.56.211.206:50070

Jobtracker web UI available at http://50.56.211.206:50030

You will also see that a site file was created for you at:

/root/.whirr/myhadoopcluster/hadoop-site.xml

You need to update your your local Hadoop configuration to use this file.  Type the following commands:

cp -r /etc/hadoop-0.20/conf.empty /etc/hadoop-0.20/conf.whirr
rm -f /etc/hadoop-0.20/conf.whirr/*-site.xml
cp ~/.whirr/myhadoopcluster/hadoop-site.xml /etc/hadoop-0.20/conf.whirr
alternatives –install /etc/hadoop-0.20/conf hadoop-0.20-conf /etc/hadoop-0.20/conf.whirr 50
alternatives –display hadoop-0.20-conf

A proxy script was created for you at:

/root/.whirr/myhadoopcluster/hadoop-proxy.sh

You should now start that proxy.  It is there for security reasons.  All traffic from the network where your client is running is proxied through the master node of the cluster using an SSH tunnel.  This script launches the proxy.  Run the following command to launch the script:

~/.whirr/myhadoopcluster/hadoop-proxy.sh

If that doesn’t run make sure you have the right permissions on the file by

chmod +rwx hadoop-proxy.sh

Then try again.

With the above you are now able to use your Hadoop Cluster.

Prove that by browsing HDFS:

hadoop fs -ls /

Now it is time to run a MapReduce job!  We are going to use one of the example programs provided in the Hadoop installation. The program is in the file Hadoop-*examples*.jar  First, a lets review list of options available form the program. See these by entering:

hadoop jar $HADOOP_HOME/hadoop-examples-*.jar

You will see:

An example program must be given as the first argument.
Valid program names are:
aggregatewordcount: An Aggregate based map/reduce program that counts the words in the input files.
aggregatewordhist: An Aggregate based map/reduce program that computes the histogram of the words in the input files.
dbcount: An example job that count the pageview counts from a database.
grep: A map/reduce program that counts the matches of a regex in the input.
join: A job that effects a join over sorted, equally partitioned datasets
multifilewc: A job that counts words from several files.
pentomino: A map/reduce tile laying program to find solutions to pentomino problems.
pi: A map/reduce program that estimates Pi using monte-carlo method.
randomtextwriter: A map/reduce program that writes 10GB of random textual data per node.
randomwriter: A map/reduce program that writes 10GB of random data per node.
secondarysort: An example defining a secondary sort to the reduce.
sleep: A job that sleeps at each map and reduce task.
sort: A map/reduce program that sorts the data written by the random writer.
sudoku: A sudoku solver.
teragen: Generate data for the terasort
terasort: Run the terasort
teravalidate: Checking results of terasort
wordcount: A map/reduce program that counts the words in the input files.

So lets put this info to use. We will make a directory put some info in there, and run the wordcount program:

 

$ export HADOOP_HOME=/usr/lib/hadoop
$ hadoop fs -mkdir input
$ hadoop fs -put $HADOOP_HOME/CHANGES.txt input
$ hadoop jar $HADOOP_HOME/hadoop-examples-*.jar wordcount input output
$ hadoop fs -cat output/part-* | head

Now you are off and running.

You now have a platform capable of scaling to very large jobs. And it runs CDH3, the most reliable, capable distribution of Hadoop and related technologies. Let the fun begin!

But one final note. Think about the lifecycle of your system. At some time you will need to spin it down and turn it off.  To destroy the cluster gracefully using Whirr, enter this command:

whirr destroy-cluster –config hadoop.properties

Using the information above you can create and better manage Hadoop Clusters on Rackspace very easily. This is how we create our CDH Clusters.  In future posts we will show you how to get data prepared for analysis and how to run some queries.  We will also provide tips on how to use Cloudera’s free management tools and how to upgrade to Cloudera Enterprise when you are ready.

 

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Bob Gourley

Bob Gourley writes on enterprise IT. He is a founder of Crucial Point and publisher of CTOvision.com

Comments (0)

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


IoT & Smart Cities Stories
The challenges of aggregating data from consumer-oriented devices, such as wearable technologies and smart thermostats, are fairly well-understood. However, there are a new set of challenges for IoT devices that generate megabytes or gigabytes of data per second. Certainly, the infrastructure will have to change, as those volumes of data will likely overwhelm the available bandwidth for aggregating the data into a central repository. Ochandarena discusses a whole new way to think about your next...
DXWorldEXPO LLC announced today that Big Data Federation to Exhibit at the 22nd International CloudEXPO, colocated with DevOpsSUMMIT and DXWorldEXPO, November 12-13, 2018 in New York City. Big Data Federation, Inc. develops and applies artificial intelligence to predict financial and economic events that matter. The company uncovers patterns and precise drivers of performance and outcomes with the aid of machine-learning algorithms, big data, and fundamental analysis. Their products are deployed...
Dynatrace is an application performance management software company with products for the information technology departments and digital business owners of medium and large businesses. Building the Future of Monitoring with Artificial Intelligence. Today we can collect lots and lots of performance data. We build beautiful dashboards and even have fancy query languages to access and transform the data. Still performance data is a secret language only a couple of people understand. The more busine...
All in Mobile is a place where we continually maximize their impact by fostering understanding, empathy, insights, creativity and joy. They believe that a truly useful and desirable mobile app doesn't need the brightest idea or the most advanced technology. A great product begins with understanding people. It's easy to think that customers will love your app, but can you justify it? They make sure your final app is something that users truly want and need. The only way to do this is by ...
CloudEXPO | DevOpsSUMMIT | DXWorldEXPO are the world's most influential, independent events where Cloud Computing was coined and where technology buyers and vendors meet to experience and discuss the big picture of Digital Transformation and all of the strategies, tactics, and tools they need to realize their goals. Sponsors of DXWorldEXPO | CloudEXPO benefit from unmatched branding, profile building and lead generation opportunities.
Digital Transformation and Disruption, Amazon Style - What You Can Learn. Chris Kocher is a co-founder of Grey Heron, a management and strategic marketing consulting firm. He has 25+ years in both strategic and hands-on operating experience helping executives and investors build revenues and shareholder value. He has consulted with over 130 companies on innovating with new business models, product strategies and monetization. Chris has held management positions at HP and Symantec in addition to ...
Cell networks have the advantage of long-range communications, reaching an estimated 90% of the world. But cell networks such as 2G, 3G and LTE consume lots of power and were designed for connecting people. They are not optimized for low- or battery-powered devices or for IoT applications with infrequently transmitted data. Cell IoT modules that support narrow-band IoT and 4G cell networks will enable cell connectivity, device management, and app enablement for low-power wide-area network IoT. B...
The hierarchical architecture that distributes "compute" within the network specially at the edge can enable new services by harnessing emerging technologies. But Edge-Compute comes at increased cost that needs to be managed and potentially augmented by creative architecture solutions as there will always a catching-up with the capacity demands. Processing power in smartphones has enhanced YoY and there is increasingly spare compute capacity that can be potentially pooled. Uber has successfully ...
SYS-CON Events announced today that CrowdReviews.com has been named “Media Sponsor” of SYS-CON's 22nd International Cloud Expo, which will take place on June 5–7, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY. CrowdReviews.com is a transparent online platform for determining which products and services are the best based on the opinion of the crowd. The crowd consists of Internet users that have experienced products and services first-hand and have an interest in letting other potential buye...
When talking IoT we often focus on the devices, the sensors, the hardware itself. The new smart appliances, the new smart or self-driving cars (which are amalgamations of many ‘things'). When we are looking at the world of IoT, we should take a step back, look at the big picture. What value are these devices providing. IoT is not about the devices, its about the data consumed and generated. The devices are tools, mechanisms, conduits. This paper discusses the considerations when dealing with the...