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Linux Processes: Structure, Hangs and Core Dumps

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Troubleshooting a Linux process follows the same general methodology as that used with traditional UNIX systems. In both systems, for process hangs, we identify the system resources being used by the process and attempt to identify the cause for the process to stop responding. With application core dumps, we must identify the signal for which the process terminated and proceed with acquiring a stack trace to identify system calls made by the process at the time it died. There exists neither a "golden" troubleshooting path nor a set of instructions that can be applied for all cases. Some conditions are much easier to solve than others, but with a good understanding of the fundamentals, a solution is not far from reach.

This article is an excerpt from Linux Troubleshooting for System Administrators and Power Users by James Kirkland, David Carmichael, Christopher Tinker and Gregory Tinker, published by Prentice Hall.

This excerpt explains various facets of Linux processes. We begin by examining the structure of a process and its life cycle from creation to termination. This is followed by a discussion of Linux threads. The aforementioned establish a basis for proceeding with a discussion of process hangs and core dumps.

Process Structure and Life Cycle
This section begins with an overview of process concepts and terms, noting the similarities and differences between UNIX and Linux. We then move on to discuss process relationships, process creation, and process termination.

Process/Task Overview
It is helpful to begin with a general comparison of processes in UNIX and in Linux. Both operating systems use processes; however, the terminology employed by each differs slightly. Both use the term "process" to refer to process structure. Linux also uses the term "task" to refer to its processes. Therefore, in Linux, the terms "process" and "task" are used interchangeably, and this chapter also so uses them. Note that UNIX does not use the term "task."

The process structures of the two operating systems differ more dramatically, which is easily recognized when observing a multithreaded program in action. The thread is the actual workhorse of the process and is sometimes referred to as a lightweight process (LWP). In Linux, every thread is a task or process; however, this is not the case with UNIX.

As described previously, the UNIX process model places its threads within the process structure. This structure contains the process's state, process ID (PID), parent process ID (PPID), file table, signal table, thread(s), scheduling, and other information. Thus, there is only one PID for a process that can have many threads. However, when a process calls the pthread_create() subroutine in Linux, it creates another task/PID, which just happens to share the same address space. Figure 1 depicts this fundamental difference. Figure 1 Comparison of UNIX and Linux processes

Unlike UNIX, Linux does not have a kernel object that represents the process structure; instead, it uses a task structure. Each task has a unique ID just like a UNIX PID. However, the Linux task model only represents a single thread of execution. In this way, a task can be thought of as a single UNIX thread. Just like the UNIX process structure, the Linux task structure contains the task's state, PID, PPID, file table, address space, signals, scheduling, and so on. In addition, it contains the Task Group ID (tgid), which we elaborate on later in this chapter.

Process Relationships
When troubleshooting a process, it is crucial to identify all related tasks/processes, and there are several approaches to doing so. A task could hang or dump core because a resource it requires is in use by another process, or a parent could mask a signal that the child needs to execute properly. When it comes to identifying a process's relationship to others, you could use the /proc/<pid>/ directory to manually search out a process's information and its relationship to others. Relationships can also be determined by the use of commands such as ps, pstree, and top, among others, which make use of this pseudo filesystem. These tools make short work of obtaining a picture of a process's state and its relationship to others.

Linux Process Creation
An understanding of process creation is necessary for troubleshooting a process. Processes are created in Linux in much the same way as they are created in UNIX. When executing a new command, the fork() system call sets up the child's context to reference the parent's context and creates a new stack. This referencing of the parent's context (essentially a pointer to the parent's task_struct() structure) increases overall OS performance. The child's context references the parent's context until modification is required, at which point the parent's address space is copied and modified. This is achieved by the copy-on-write (COW) design.

Shortly after fork() has set up the new task for execution, the exec system call is made. This is where the copy-on-write does its magic. The parent's structure is no longer just referenced; rather, it is copied into a new virtual location. Next, the object file (command) is copied into this location, overwriting the copied pages. Now the new task's context is set up, and the new process is running.

There are some differences between how processes are created in UNIX and how they are created in Linux. For example, some flavors of UNIX perform a copy-on-access, for which the fork() copies the context of the parent to a new virtual memory address with no references pointing back to the parent's context. One is no better than the other because in a majority of instances, the referenced pages must be modified, causing the COW method to copy the pages anyway.

An Example of Linux Process Creation
In this section, we demonstrate the fork() system call by tracing the parent process. In this example, we use the ls command to list a file. Because the ls program is the child of its local shell, we need to trace the shell from which the ll (ls -al alias) command is executed. Two shell windows are required to perform this test.

1.  Window one: Determine the pseudo terminal and PID of shell.

# echo $$
16935

The parent shell's PID is 16935. Now we must start the trace in a second window.

2.  Window two: Start trace of shell process.

# strace -o /tmp/ll.strace -f -p 16935


More Stories By James Kirkland

James Kirkland is the advocate for Red Hat's initiatives and solutions for the Internet of Things(IoT) and is the architect of its three-tier strategy for IoT deployments. For the past five years, James has been focused on IoT solutions for the transportation and energy sectors. A frequent public speaker and writer on a wide range of technical topics, James is also the co-author of Linux Troubleshooting for System Administrators and Power Users (ISBN: 0131855158) published by Prentice Hall PTR. He has been working with UNIX and Linux variants over the course of 20 years in his positions at Red Hat, and in previous roles at Racemi and Hewlett-Packard.

More Stories By David Carmichael

David Carmichael works for Hewlett-Packard as a technical problem manager in Alpharetta, Georgia. He earned a bachelors degree in computer science from West Virginia University in 1987 and has been helping customers resolve their IT problems ever since. David has written articles for HP's IT Resource Center (http://itrc.hp.com) and presented at HP World 2003.

More Stories By Greg Tinker

Greg Tinker began his career while at Bellsouth in Atlanta, Georgia. Greg joined Hewlett-Packard in 1999. Greg's primary role is as a storage business recovery specialist and has participated in HP World, taught several classes in Unix/Linux and Disk Array technology, and obtained various certifications including certifications in Advanced Clusters, SAN, and Linux.

More Stories By Chris Tinker

Chris Tinker began his career in computers while working as a Unix System Administrator for Lockheed Martin in Marietta, Georgia. Chris joined Hewlett-Packard in 1999. Chris's primary role at HP is as a senior software business recovery specialist and has participated in HP World, taught several classes in Unix/Linux and Disk Array technology, and obtained various certifications including certifications in Advanced Clusters, SAN, and Linux.

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Linux News Desk 07/13/06 04:59:25 PM EDT

Troubleshooting a Linux process follows the same general methodology as that used with traditional UNIX systems. In both systems, for process hangs, we identify the system resources being used by the process and attempt to identify the cause for the process to stop responding. With application core dumps, we must identify the signal for which the process terminated and proceed with acquiring a stack trace to identify system calls made by the process at the time it died. There exists neither a 'golden' troubleshooting path nor a set of instructions that can be applied for all cases. Some conditions are much easier to solve than others, but with a good understanding of the fundamentals, a solution is not far from reach.

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