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Open Source Authors: Liz McMillan, Pat Romanski, Roger Strukhoff, Felix Xavier, Elizabeth White

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The Problem with Ignoring the Code Quality of Open Source Applications

Thanks to the Heartbleed bug, the code quality of open source software was thrown into the limelight this year as the world realized how unsecure the IT services they use daily actually are. However, while enterprise IT organizations have come to realize the benefits of using open source, blindly trusting the open source community to catch every mistake in the code is not a sound business decision, and quite frankly, unfair towards open source developers. You can find open source code all over business applications — in webservers running Linux and Apache, in databases, in mobile operating systems, and in enterprise grade code libraries. The problem is, while enterprise developers cut and paste code into their applications to keep up with a breakneck velocity, they can’t accurately assess what kinds of vulnerabilities are present in the code. To help make sense of this software development catch-22, our own Lev Lesokhin spoke with CSO Online about how large IT organizations can secure their business critical applications from known vulnerabilities and shoddy software quality. Be sure to check out the article here. How are you using open source software in your organization? And are you taking the proper steps to secure it? If not you could be leaving your organization’s IT vulnerable to countless attacks and slowdowns.

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More Stories By Lev Lesokhin

Lev Lesokhin is responsible for CAST's market development, strategy, thought leadership and product marketing worldwide. He has a passion for making customers successful, building the ecosystem, and advancing the state of the art in business technology. Lev comes to CAST from SAP, where he was Director, Global SME Marketing. Prior to SAP, Lev was at the Corporate Executive Board as one of the leaders of the Applications Executive Council, where he worked with the heads of applications organizations at Fortune 1000 companies to identify best management practices.