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After Ubuntu, Windows Looks Increasingly Bad, Increasingly Archaic, Increasingly Unfriendly

The Changing Trajectory of Software

My recent switch to a single-boot Ubuntu setup on my Thinkpad T60 simply floors me on a regular basis. Most recently it's had to do with the experience of maintaining the software. Fresh from a very long Windows 2000 experience and a four-month Windows XP experience along with a long-time Linux sys admin role puts me in a great position to assess Ubuntu. Three prior attempts over the years at using Linux as my daily desktop OS had me primed for failure. Well, Ubuntu takes Linux where I've long hoped it would go - easy to use, reliable, dependable, great applications too but more on that later. It has some elegance to it - bet you never heard that about a Linux desktop before.

There are many night-and-day differences between Windows and Ubuntu and, for a guy that does 80% standard office tasks and the rest of the time I'm doing Linux admin tasks, it was nearly all in favor of Ubuntu after the first few weeks of the transition. Overall, my productivity and the scope of things I can do with Ubuntu far exceed what I could do with Windows and just as importantly Ubuntu (like any Linux would) lets me easily create my own productivity shortcuts of a variety of sorts.

One of the things that's become clear as I've gotten used to the appliance-like experience of Ubuntu is that the future of software in an open source-dominated world is going to be significantly different than the world dominated by Microsoft. So what distant point on the horizon has Ubuntu shone a light on for me? Simple. Software will increasingly compete on ease of use in the total software experience more than on features. The future will be more about being simple than about any other dimension.

Here are some recent use cases:

_ I needed to rebuild my T60 with a fresh OS. Which was easier? MS Windows with a factory install disk, separate disks for Office and for Virus protection and then a lot of hunt-and-peck downloading for various apps like Thunderbird, Firefox, SSH, and Calendar or....Ubuntu with one CD and an OS that includes an integrated, extensible, and slick software package manager where all the software is approved and tailored to the installation?

_ I needed to rebuild a T43. I tried to use the rebuild partition included on the HD but it was corrupt. So I tried to make factory-install disks but the corrupt partition prevented it. Next option? Call Lenovo and get disks sent for $51. That process took five days and eight CD-ROMs from start to finish. With Ubuntu, this process takes three hours max, not four days and there's no software keys or other things to track down. The labor involved is less than a fifth with Ubuntu and the delivered product is a lot more productive - for my use models anyway.

_ I needed to resubscribe to Symantec on a Windows machine. Again this is a 30-60 minute timeout from production AND a $49 charge AND a hassle with product keys and sending data about my machine and purchases around to companies that I'd choose not have it if I had a choice. But I didn't since Windows XP needs Symantec's products badly even though these scanning and cleaning products degrade machine performance badly - even with a gig of RAM.

_ And I now hear that Windows Vista renames the partition it's installed on what used to be the C: partition. I need to check out this story but the very idea of automatic partition renaming is insane to even contemplate.

So my machine sings with Ubuntu. Having no virus scanning alone unleashes a responsiveness that makes the power of the T60's Intel dual-core shine. And what am I noticing most about all of this?

Well, first off Ubuntu is good as a productivity platform. Without that, the rest wouldn't matter a bit. But since Ubuntu is not only good on features but reliability then at least some of us would crawl over broken glass to get it installed.

But, in fact, there's no broken glass in the picture. It's the opposite. Ubuntu's installation is so easy, and maintaining it once it's installed is so simple that Ubuntu nearly falls into your machine like a ying to the hardware's yang. Once there, Ubuntu happily makes a home in your head with hardly a blip. I think Ubuntu actually dropped my blood pressure. Not something you typically find when switching ALL your software for something that's about as alien to Windows as it possibly can be.

Once that major hurdle is cleared, then the other big issues come into focus. Ease of install, easy updates, easy software maintenance, easy data backups. After experiencing Ubuntu, the world of Windows looks increasingly bad, increasingly archaic, increasingly like a neighborhood that makes life hard. Why should I put up with what Windows makes me go through if I don't have to?

I've used rsync for backups for years. I back up my mail, my Thunderbird data, and "my document" directory (i.e., /home/xxxx/). One of these backup commands looks like this and sits in a single shell script and runs from cron once a day (I've already sent the ssh key to the backup target server so no need to manually login to the backup server for this command to run):

rsync -avgz /home/xxxx/.mozilla-thunderbird/ [email protected]:/hdb/ibmt60-ubuntu-mozilla-tbird/ >>
/home/xxxx/backup-.txt

That little command executes in a few seconds to a few minutes no matter where I am on the Internet and even if I've added some decently sized files to my computer. I've got my home router set up to pass the ssh port 22 through to a Linux server sitting in my attic. Quick and painless backups run without a hitch. It's a thing of beauty. I use the same solution for my servers so having a single platform from server to desktop has benefits and this is but one of them. I used to sweat about my Windows backups in the old days - if I did them every two weeks, I was happy. Ubuntu dropped my blood pressure on backups alone by 10% and now I have to decide how often is too often to do a backup. Also, I'm up on the MIRRA product but, trust me, you don't want to forget a password there.

Through a similar setup, I can also print to my home printer from any Internet connection. This is not a Windows- or Linux-specific feature but it's nice to have and I use it more than I expected. This is just good fun but it may also drop my blood pressure a point or two.

So far, none of this is news to those in the know about Ubuntu. It's not news but it is a big deal. A very big deal. Ubuntu is getting rave reviews: it's a productive platform, it's a reliable platform, it's a durable platform, it's an upgradeable platform, it's an easy-to-install platform, and adoption is through the roof.

What's changing in all this?

In my view, once you realize the platform is viable from a daily productivity standpoint (exceedingly so), the #1 thing that Ubuntu is then changing is ease of access to software. If I had decided to rebuild my PC with Windows XP - we won't even talk about Vista - this is what I was looking at:

1) Buy OEM Install disks from Lenovo because my rebuild partition was corrupt - $51.

2) Buy a Symantec subscription because I was done with the 90-day free trial - $49.

3) Buy an extra 512MB of RAM because XP couldn't run Firefox, Thunderbird, MS Word, MS Excel, and SSH all at once with 512MB of installed RAM - $104.

4) Install all of the above with product keys along the way - four hours? Maybe six? Maybe more because the tools for getting 2GB-3GB of mail data back into Thunderbird in Windows aren't nearly as good as the same tools in Linux.

That's $204 just to get me back to where I thought I was two months back - i.e., a machine with XP and Office on it. Symantec alone is going to want to pick my pocket again at some point.

Ubuntu releases me from these costs and from these long-term headaches:

1) Viruses - I no longer worry and I no longer need to check my PC - that's a relief. You can pick nits here about security but the bottom line is Ubuntu is orders of magnitude better.

2) Vulnerabilities - Windows is like Swiss cheese with so many vulnerabilities that it's sick - you can't connect XP to a public Internet connection (i.e., behind a router is OK but direct to the net isn't). Ubuntu? It's Linux - no worries.

3) Thanks to #1 and #2, I'm free from products like Symantec and Norton and the dollar expense, the complexity of administering them (those pop-ups are annoying and a productivity hit), and wondering when they expire next.

4) Software updates for the entire collection of software on the machine are simple in Ubuntu.

5) Backups are automatic.

That's batting for the cycle. Am I missing anything? Anything at all? Yes. Printing is easier in Ubuntu for older printers like the HP Laserjet 4 on a D-Link print server in the office and the HP 6L on an SMC print server in the home office. Multifunction printers are more of a challenge. A little care in printer purchases going forward takes this issue off the plate and I'm fine with the printer solution in place that has largely been stumbled upon.

The one bit of software that was Windows-related was a QuickBooks Timer. I haven't needed it because I began editing the output of that program in Excel six months ago because the QuickBooks Timer was too much of a clod interface to be productive. When I switched from Microsoft Office to OpenOffice on Windows XP, I continued not using the QuickBooks Timer. Doing the same manual editing of these QuickBooks Timer output files in OpenOffice Calc on Linux is a breeze. If there were a QuickBooks Timer for Linux, I wouldn't use it so I haven't checked for it.

In sum, what's changing about software? The installation, maintenance, and use of software in Windows have become a burden. A huge burden. And I don't think the average Windows user realizes how much out of their way they are going to keep their Windows PCs working. Windows challenges users and makes for a very expensive user experience in time and dollars if users follow the book and use the latest virus protection, keep that protection updated, and avoid the pitfalls that are squarely on the path that normal users use. In the best case, you end up with a machine that has a lot of crapware installed on it and is slow and clunky to use. In the more typical case, you end up with a machine that spirals to a grinding halt over six to 12 months - like the T43 I'm working on right now. A machine that has trouble opening an Excel file in three minutes because it has so much software competing for disk access and CPU cycles.

My experience with Linux on the server with its multi-hundred day uptimes broken by hardware upgrades, not software reboots, and with no performance degradation even at high disk utilizations tells me Ubuntu isn't taking me down with it. My blood pressure is truly low now.

I'm literally running out the door to get the word rolling on this changing dynamic. It's that big. And a word to IBM and Lenovo: if you're listening, Ubuntu as an OEM install on your Thinkpad T and X series would be a huge win for you and for the the OSS adoption curve. This is a classic case of experience changing perception and it's got me to thinking about a seamless platform from server to desktop to phone - think about it.

More Stories By Paul Nowak

Paul Nowak first used Linux in 1995 while migrating from Sun to Linux at the University of Michigan. He used Linux in subsequent IT projects including web, telecom, telemetry and embedded projects and is currently CIO of a small professional association based in Washington D.C.

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Most Recent Comments
Anders Wallin 06/07/07 02:53:55 AM EDT

to make the switch I would have to be sure that there are replacements/alternatives to the following software packages. They need to produce files that are compatible/identical with the corresponding MS/Windows apps (xls, doc, ppt etc.)
1. excel, word, powerpoint (is open office any good? how well does it communicate with MS-Office?)
2. corel draw/photo-paint (Gimp and inkscape I guess?)
3. Matlab (I don't think Octave is good enough)
4. LabView (is it available for ubuntu?)
5. Adobe Acrobat

I'm not sure all of the basic tools are there yet, but in a few years time they might well be...

Tom Jones 06/07/07 02:29:10 AM EDT

It all comes down to money at the end of the day, even if you took half a minute to really look at Ubuntu you would realize Microsoft has been taking everyone for a ride for some time. People want to pay for something. When they get something for free its assumed to be not as good etc. But at the end of the day M$ has loads of $$$ and can keep on doing all their evil things to keep Windowz on top, but slowly people will start to wake up and see how M$ has been ripping everyone off and people will say why did we every pay for this before?

sorry 06/06/07 11:35:12 PM EDT

I'm not using javascript.

MT 06/06/07 10:14:35 PM EDT

your article is much too biased. your threee main points can easily be refuted by careful selection of software and paying attantion to where you keep your stuff. And backups. Come one. you can do that on Win.
I'm not saying Ubuntu is crap and you should stick to Win, I use Ubuntu myself, but I do think that the points you raise as being oh so great are nowhere near as amazing as you make them sound.

Steve 06/06/07 10:11:34 PM EDT

Hey,

First, I've used Ubuntu and Kubuntu for a year or more now. It's pretty good and getting better. I also use XP... I wish I could say that XP is as bad as you make it seem. I love Linux in many flavors. It truly is great. I'm more of a BSD freak personally, but everything has its use. Windows is what it is and I feel you overdid some of your comments regarding the Microsoft product. I won't debate or give you a hard time about your preference. Please, for the sake of the open source community, try to be a little more objective and accurate with your assessments. It'll build a better case for us who are inclined to try it and attract more of those who have not yet been exposed. I am not a writer so I can't comment on your technical ability to write, but this article is slanderous. So much so, that I was compelled to comment in defense of a product I don't like.

Before I dig in, I'll let you be. Maybe you'll take my comments into consideration before writing your next article. If you do, I'm sure a lot more people who have yet to try Ubuntu or any of the other great flavors of Linux, will listen and educate themselves to have the same level of comfort with it that you enjoy.

dizzy 06/06/07 07:48:47 PM EDT

I am glad to see more people explaining the benefits of distros like Ubuntu clearly. The package management models are amazing, no serial hunting, no CD hoarding, etc. My only concern with this article is the "Its Linux, its completely secure" mentality. That is the exact same mentality that allowed MS products to continue their life cycle with so many horrible security flaws. Linux is considerably better in security, and a large part of it is by design, but that doesn't mean that it can't or won't be compromised.

Also, care to explain why EVERY ad on this page as I read it is an ad for MS products, and a "Why Win2k3 server beats linux" ad?

icewater 06/06/07 07:32:19 PM EDT

what an obnoxious pair of ads you have on this page. a gigantic javascript popup and a video that plays by itself, interrupting any multimedia i might have playing on my system already?

disgusting. i'm not coming here anymore.

Matthew Brock 06/06/07 07:02:38 PM EDT

I really want to be able to use Linux, but haven't had as good luck as you. But... I think you are being a little unfair in your complaints.

1. You should have created the Install CD's when you first got the machine which you are usually warned to do. Then, you would have had them when your machine went south. That saves the $51 and the time waiting for them.

2. There are good, free alternatives to Norton. I don't use any Norton products on my or my clients computers. AVG Anti-Virus is free and light weight and doesn't bring your system to its knees.

3. I hate the installation key-codes, too, but you enter them once and then you're good to go. After getting the base system installed with Office, etc., use a program to image the install partition. Partition the hard drive so your data isn't on C: and when your system starts slowing down and won't speed up with standard cleaning practices, backup any data that is on your C drive and reimage your install. No product keys, and it only takes about 1/2 hour and your system is running like new.

Dennis Ormott 06/06/07 06:56:33 PM EDT

Hey - Great article!

Try ClickTime for time tracking. We use it on our Ubuntu workstations (in Firefox) and it does a great job interfacing with Quickbooks (using our one Windows box)

Ubuntu Time Tracker 06/06/07 06:47:32 PM EDT

Some suggestions to replace QuickBooks Timer in Linux:

http://www.extremetech.com/article2/0,1697,2139736,00.asp
There are a variety of packages that enable you to track your time on projects. Some examples include gnotime, gtimer, gtimelog, wmwork, and worklog. Each of these packages allows you to create a project, start and stop a work-time clock, and easily switch between projects. They also allow you set the accumulation interval (from one minute to hourly) and display total time spent summaries.
Gnotime isn't perfect. It cannot merge times from multiple people or export to a spreadsheet. However, it is more than enough for tracking the work from a single individual. For group tracking, consider a collaborative project tracking system such as gforge.

willie 06/06/07 06:03:15 PM EDT

YOUR FEEDBACK EMAIL SYSTEM IS HORKED!!!

YOU ARE NOW LISTED AS A SPAMMER!

John Doe 06/06/07 05:59:50 PM EDT

Just a little biased. A linux admin loves linux on his laptop, big surprise. Put Linux on the desktops and laptops of 80 percent of the people out there and the complaints you have about Windows will inevitably permeate the linux world. You love the single package with everything on one disk, but remember that when Microsoft attempted to provide an OS with all the apps most people need preinstalled they got slammed by lawsuits. They integrated IE with their base install and Netscape went after them. They included their own Java virtual machine in the base install and Sun sued them. And the practice of providing GPL software for free for the Linux version, but charging for the Windows version is absurd. Just a tactic to take take marketshare any way they can.

So, enjoy your time in the shadows of the desktop world. You will wilt and shrivel when you step out into the sun ;)

Tim Harris 06/06/07 05:55:25 PM EDT

I agree 100% !!! I too have moved over to UBUNTU. There is no need for me to play games anymore. Either I have gotten too old for them, or once you played one you have really played them all. So moving over to UBUNTU, as an artist, I was looking for other things. Cost, hardware, 64 bit support, and your basic array of software applications are all there. I just built a brand new machine and will never look at a Windows OS again. Cool post.

Richard Steven Hack 06/06/07 05:46:27 PM EDT

Uhm, great article.

But why would you ever buy Norton AV? Go to AOL and get their Antivirus Shield for free which is a stripped down version of Kaspersky 6.0 - and that is a better virus detector than Norton, anyway. You can use the AV Shield in a corporate environment because it's licensed to the user, not the company. That makes it useless for deploying widely in a company, but for one person or machine, it's fine.

I just had to uninstall Norton from a client's machine because it was slowing it to a crawl for some reason. And I got lucky because this time it actually uninstalled itself correctly - half the time Norton won't.

Never use anything from Symantec. It's garbage.

Duffy Green 06/06/07 05:45:03 PM EDT

I use Linux at home and I always will. However, my day job as a Windows sysadmin slaps me in the face and reminds me of so many areas where Linux is still lagging. For example, as a Windows sysadmin, I can manage desktop security by simply using Group Policy. I'm not aware of any enterprise Linux solution similar to Group Policy. If it's out there, I'd love to know what it is. Secondly, what do you do about all the propriety software out there that only runs on Windows. Yeah, I can already hear the remarks now that they should find an open source solution, blah, blah, blah. You tell that to a Board of Directors or a group of VP's. When openoffice integrates with SharePoint the way that Office does, then it will truly be a threat but for now, the corporate world is increasingly being tied to Office as SharePoint becomes more and more prevalent out there. Yes, I know about Plone and other open source portal products out there but they aren't anywhere near SharePoint yet.

So, while I love Linux and open source and do everything to promote it, the flip side of the coin is that it still isn't enterprise ready to run in a 3,000+ desktop environment like ours. I wish it were.....

Owen 06/06/07 05:34:52 PM EDT

Why are you using *anything* from Symantec? Don't blame Windows for Symantec's problems, there are plenty of other virus programs (NOD32 for example) that jump up and down on Symantec. A simple piece of advice for using Windows is never install anything with the word Symantec or Norton's in its title. And if your pc comes with it installed, uninstall it! Windows is perfectly capable of breaking without any extra help from Symantec.

Ugarit Ebla 06/06/07 04:33:47 PM EDT

One thing that Linux has that WinXX and Mac OS X does not is that installed packages in Linux are taxonomized, i.e. categorized. Therefore, I can list all Games, Internet, etc. applications. To the best of my knowledge neither WinXX nor Mac OS X can do this.

Darrin 06/06/07 04:26:35 PM EDT

Four Months on Windows XP does NOT make you an authority on this.

Momma's Boy 06/06/07 03:57:52 PM EDT

Great article - I'll let my 60 year old mother know she can handle the rsync command herself to backup her files.

APK 06/06/07 03:56:04 PM EDT

Scott:

See this URL ->

http://linux.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=237577&cid=19415105

What's in it, SHOULD help, though most webmasters do NOT like some of what I put in there... it's their monies, but, by the same token? We pay for our online time!

Some of it functions for security, & to me??

That is PARAMOUNT, especially online, today!

(Because, believe it or not guys, if you don't know already? Some adbanners over the past 2-4 years now have harbored malware/ill effects in them).

ALSO:

Andrew, thanks for the compliment, I hope you find material in that post that's useful to you, & GOOD LUCK IN YOUR TESTING!

I do like VISTA myself, I must admit, but am sticking to its direct ancestor in Windows Server 2003 SP #2, @ least until SP #1 for VISTA (should iron-out complaints folks have by then)...

& I look @ it this way (sometimes, though zealotry, without GOOD SOLID 110% CORRECT INFO. BEHIND IT, does @ times, bug me as well):

Competition = GOOD! Who gains? We all do, as end users.

IMO, @ least? Linux vs. Windows is a GOOD thing folks!

Simply because you have OPTIONS & CHOICES of OS' you can use (& imo, having LINUX @ home is excellent training grounds for UNIX, and UNIX IS NOT DEAD (far from it) - if anything KILLS UNIX, it will be Linux though, I predict...)

Thus, between Windows & Linux? You have those options & they are very VERY close to one another in terms of stability, security, application base, flexibility, & MORE, on most ALL LEVELS, because Linux exists!

If there was NO LINUX? Think we'd have something as good as Windows Server 2003 (the underpinnings of VISTA)??

Ah, anyhow - keep @ it Penguins: Like I said in my 1st post here, you've come a LONG ways since when I first tried Linux more than a decade ago, & are getting there by ALL means!

APK

P.S.=> Additionally, do you guys think Microsoft just ignores material from the LINUX world? Not! They hired on Bill Hilf for instance, & that is a signal they DO take Linux seriously, & consider it a threat, but ARE trying to make things "work together"... @ least to SOME extent! apk

willie 06/06/07 03:47:09 PM EDT

@scott - pop-ups are definitely annoying, but there's no reason to suffer them...

1. use firefox
2. enable pop-up blocker
3. install the noscript extension
4. install the adblock extension

- voila! no more Web annoyances and a much safer 'net experience!

willie 06/06/07 03:43:42 PM EDT

ubuntu is pretty good, but the article is a tad gushing... i suppose it's exciting to have a release reliably install and work from the 'get-go'...

however, ubuntu still doesn't include ndiswrapper-utils in it's base distro, making an install on a Broadcom-hobbled notebook a pain-in-the-you-know-what...

also, ATI and Nvidia support pretty much sucks, with many users having to resort to the somewhat-obscure Envy package to get proprietary driver installs...

also, support still lacks for mmc/sd/ms readers (and no, i'm not looking a gift horse in the mouth - i'm very grateful for free software programmer efforts!)

altogether though, ubuntu pretty much rocks when installed and configured...

Scott 06/06/07 03:28:25 PM EDT

This site uses the most annoying pop-up I've ever seen. I refuse to read your article or any future articles, and will not look at your ads as long as you so forcefully attempt to shove your ads down my throat.

Dan 06/06/07 03:26:16 PM EDT

If anyone seriously questions why 90% of users don't (and will never) use linux the answer was provided in this article:

"One of these backup commands . . . sits in a single shell script and runs from cron once a day (I've already sent the ssh key to the backup target server so no need to manually login to the backup server for this command to run)"

Our grandmothers (as the proverbial placeholder for novice users) are not going to spend time learning how to edit the cron file in emacs let alone about "sending the ssh key to the target server".

Andrew DeFaria 06/06/07 03:17:25 PM EDT

As long as people stupidly point out things that just aren't there they will not be taken seriously. Case in point:

"1) Buy OEM Install disks from Lenovo because my rebuild partition was corrupt - $51."

Well who's fault is it that your partition was corrupt? And how many times does that happen to your average person? The answer is close to 0 thus rendering this point moot.

"2) Buy a Symantec subscription because I was done with the 90-day free trial - $49."

Again, what does this have to do with anything? So your 90-day trial happened to be up - irrelevant!

"3) Buy an extra 512MB of RAM because XP couldn't run Firefox, Thunderbird, MS Word, MS Excel, and SSH all at once with 512MB of installed RAM - $104."

Sorry you're so inept that you can't get such things to run in 512M but I sure can (actually I believe I had only 256M). And it's disengenuous for you to complain about not being able to fit MS Office stuff in the run queue when later in the article you say that you abandoned MS Office for Open Office! Which is it?

"4) Install all of the above with product keys along the way - four hours? Maybe six? Maybe more because the tools for getting 2GB-3GB of mail data back into Thunderbird in Windows aren't nearly as good as the same tools in Linux."

4 - 6 hours?!? Man you're slow! Getting 2-3GB of mail back into TB?!? Huh? Ever hear of IMAP? There's really nothing to get mail "back into" TB as they are really just mbox files if you insist on keeping them locally thus merely putting them in the right place is all you need to do. Sounds to me like your incompetent and shouldn't be close to a computer!

And one does not necessarily need Symantec nor anything more than XP's builtin firewall. I've been on the net 24/7 since '98 on a Windows box and I have never used any AV nor have I ever gotten a virus. Again, just because you cannot pilot a plane nor run a computer does not mean that others cannot.

Another SLashdot Reader 06/06/07 03:02:44 PM EDT

Not all Slashdot readers are jerks.

I recently installed Kubuntu -- and am not going back.

Another SLashdot Reader 06/06/07 03:02:31 PM EDT

Not all Slashdot readers are jerks.

I recently installed Kubuntu -- and am not going back.

Andrew 06/06/07 02:58:03 PM EDT

APK -- just to add, I'm not saying Vista's ideal. You've got some really good stuff in your post. God knows out-of-the-box both XP & Vista require some fine-tuning to get them humming. I've using Vista right now (checking compatibility on our flagship product) and while there are a lot of things they do very well & very right, there are a number of things they dropped the ball on. A few of them I have hopes that they'll correct; others not so much.

I mostly just get annoyed when someone picks really stupid things to complain about. I mean, really, Vista gives you plenty of ammo, there's no need to go grubbing around at the bottom looking for crumbs! It's particularly galling because I'm rooting for the Linux desktop in a big way; stuff like this doesn't convince people, it just gets some of the already-convinced to chant "Preach on!" :P

deucengine 06/06/07 02:52:52 PM EDT

Let me first say I am a linux user(dual boot with XP).

The idea that Linux is virus incapable and security hole free is incorrect. There has been a proof of concept virus that could infect linux and OSx. There also has been reports of security holes in the kernal which have yet to be patched.

With that being said I do understand how bad Microsoft gets hit with things. But to say that linux can't get hit is setting yourself up for a fall. If a man can code it and man can break it.

With that I must say that my experience with Ubuntu has been enjoyable. It is by far the easiest distro I have used. I would definately recommend it to any user that need not conform with the Corp world.

APK 06/06/07 02:48:49 PM EDT

After seeing Andrews comment above mine? I do have to say that on "VISTA" (or, any NT-based Windows OS), there are ways to make it lighter/more nimble: Simple things like cutting off services you DO NOT NEED TO RUN for instance (many can be stopped, or set manual & used ONLY when needed, & MOST of them respond to this - calling apps can turn them on (PerfectDisk defragger can do so, iirc, as an example of this in this capacity)).

Some simple registry hacks help for speed, locally & online as well (Windows IS very flexible this way) and cutting off trayicon apps is another very simple way via a native tool in XP/Server 2003 called MSCONFIG.EXE (which is doubtless in VISTA too)!

It's doable, to make Windows cut down on its memory, disk, & other forms of I/O & resource consumption... if you try to, that is. It's not tough to do, & the net ABOUNDS with this type of info. online!

Search "Optimizing Windows" for instance on GOOGLE, & you get a PLETHORA of results you can use to do so.

Also, Windows CAN be secured to levels of 84.735 (that's my current score running Windows Server 2003 SP #2 in its default "workstation/pro mode" (for lack of a better expression) on the CIS Tool 1.x (invaluable for securing personal computers, & it has ports to ANY OS almost (Solaris, Windows of most types post 2000/XP/Server 2003, Linux, MacOS X etc.).

Just doing things noted here:

http://it.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=237507&cid=19410153

Can make it just as secure as ANY Linux, including SELinux, & perhaps, moreso!

They're all good stuff nowadays imo & experience - I wish I had stuff like we use TODAY, 10-15 years ago!

APK

Andrew 06/06/07 02:35:30 PM EDT

Okay, let me understand this. Vista looks bad because they don't combine various applications -- sold separately -- on one disk? Vista is terrible because Symantec charges for their product and doesn't do a good job?

And you think the OS initializing the name of it's partition after a fresh install to something is 'too insane to contemplate'? It takes all of three seconds to rename it. Jesus Christ man, get a grip.

Vista has it's flaws -- as does Ubuntu -- and you might be able to make a strong case for how it's better than Vista. But when you open with those moronic things on your checklist, you downgrade your credibility to 'zealot' before you even get out of the starting gate.

APK 06/06/07 02:02:02 PM EDT

Linux has always amazed me. Yes, I am primarily a user of Win32 OS' (mainly of the NT-based genre/build), & I code around them, because that is mostly what I have seen in "Corporate America" the past 15 yrs. or so as a developer (Delphi/Access/VB36/VB.NET/ASP.NET). What amazes me MOST about Linux though, is the fact it proves humanity CAN do great deeds/things/accomplishments, altruistically (for free/no monies involved)! It has come a LONG ways since I tried Slackware 1.x releases back in 1993-1994, & I truly like KDE (which I can create programs for, for the MOST part (avoiding Win32 specifics like the registry OR direct Win32 API calls usage & some Tcp/IP issues mostly - using Delphi for Linux (& that's Kylix!))).

So, all-in-all?

Well, it's good to see that Linux, though it is becoming more & more LIKE Windows (just as DOS became Win3.x-> Win9x -> NT & folks that used DOS said folks that used Windows were (insert putdown here)) is coming along & gaining ground/support/functionality/flexibility each release!

Linux is, imo, VERY nearly as capable as Win32 OS' are nowadays, & for most folks? It will cut it, just fine, even @ the home level, & certainly as a server in many capacities!

(However, it has lacked in device support - this is understandable though: The monies are in Win32 mostly, & developer time is NOT cheap!)

BUT, I look around lately & even device driver support is gaining ground with the BIG "oems" in this business who create the hardwares we use, on x86 rigs @ least & ones like IBM are staring to give them backing/momentum...

(x86 based rigs is where I work the most, the most used platform really - & Linux supports more than that, & I truly WISH Microsoft hadn't removed MIPS/Alpha/PowerPC etc. et al support out of Windows NT-based OS' back around NT 3.51 or shortly thereafter - bad move imo! This is an area Linux has ALWAYS had on Microsoft's stuff, & clustering's STILL another, but not by as big a margin of "error" so-to-speak & costs are in favor for the most part, for Linux (freely available) though Total Cost of Ownership studies tend to disagree with this, such as those shown @ the Microsoft "Get the Facts" campaigns via case-studies examples (I do take those with a 'grain of salt' though, admittedly)).

Anyhow/anyways - Congratulations Penguins: You're getting there, imo! apk

APK 06/06/07 02:01:51 PM EDT

Linux has always amazed me. Yes, I am primarily a user of Win32 OS' (mainly of the NT-based genre/build), & I code around them, because that is mostly what I have seen in "Corporate America" the past 15 yrs. or so as a developer (Delphi/Access/VB36/VB.NET/ASP.NET). What amazes me MOST about Linux though, is the fact it proves humanity CAN do great deeds/things/accomplishments, altruistically (for free/no monies involved)! It has come a LONG ways since I tried Slackware 1.x releases back in 1993-1994, & I truly like KDE (which I can create programs for, for the MOST part (avoiding Win32 specifics like the registry OR direct Win32 API calls usage & some Tcp/IP issues mostly - using Delphi for Linux (& that's Kylix!))).

So, all-in-all?

Well, it's good to see that Linux, though it is becoming more & more LIKE Windows (just as DOS became Win3.x-> Win9x -> NT & folks that used DOS said folks that used Windows were (insert putdown here)) is coming along & gaining ground/support/functionality/flexibility each release!

Linux is, imo, VERY nearly as capable as Win32 OS' are nowadays, & for most folks? It will cut it, just fine, even @ the home level, & certainly as a server in many capacities!

(However, it has lacked in device support - this is understandable though: The monies are in Win32 mostly, & developer time is NOT cheap!)

BUT, I look around lately & even device driver support is gaining ground with the BIG "oems" in this business who create the hardwares we use, on x86 rigs @ least & ones like IBM are staring to give them backing/momentum...

(x86 based rigs is where I work the most, the most used platform really - & Linux supports more than that, & I truly WISH Microsoft hadn't removed MIPS/Alpha/PowerPC etc. et al support out of Windows NT-based OS' back around NT 3.51 or shortly thereafter - bad move imo! This is an area Linux has ALWAYS had on Microsoft's stuff, & clustering's STILL another, but not by as big a margin of "error" so-to-speak & costs are in favor for the most part, for Linux (freely available) though Total Cost of Ownership studies tend to disagree with this, such as those shown @ the Microsoft "Get the Facts" campaigns via case-studies examples (I do take those with a 'grain of salt' though, admittedly)).

Anyhow/anyways - Congratulations Penguins: You're getting there, imo! apk

Tom Dunham 06/06/07 11:00:09 AM EDT

Well said! I've also tried in the past to convert to Linux on a personal level(Red Hat and Debian), but have always gone back to Windows because the platforms just weren't quite up to snuff yet.

However...

Once I experienced the flaming turd that is Vista, I knew I had to make a change. I thought about moving over to Apple (which I also love), but decided to throw Ubuntu on my home laptop first for a go.

I now use it for EVERYTHING, and never cease to be amazed at how much I love this platform. I installed it, and everything on my laptop just worked. The internal wireless, printers, graphics, mouse touch pad, all of it works great - and the machine is super-fast to boot!

Zaine Ridling 06/05/07 10:39:31 PM EDT

Great article, Paul! You're right, Linux makes an old machine new again and with the money saved on third-party software, I can spend that on hardware now. As a disaffected Vista user, I've spent several months testing distros. Loved PCLinuxOS. Loved Ubuntu 7.04. But settled on Fedora_7 over the weekend. Love the Package manager in Ubuntu, too.

Unlike Windows, there's a lot of excitement on the open source side of the fence, and for good reason. Distros like Fedora_7, Ubuntu, and PCLinuxOS are removing the traditional excuses why someone shouldn't reconsider Linux in their future, or right now, at least on a second machine for background tasks.

Something people need to know is what Paul writes about: the graphics are stunning, from the flexibility of Gnome to the artwork in Fedora_7. Mark Shuttleworth is one of the people making the planet a better place, and no matter which distro you use, we all owe the man.

Zaine Ridling 06/05/07 10:39:02 PM EDT

Great article, Paul! You're right, Linux makes an old machine new again and with the money saved on third-party software, I can spend that on hardware now. As a disaffected Vista user, I've spent several months testing distros. Loved PCLinuxOS. Loved Ubuntu 7.04. But settled on Fedora_7 over the weekend. Love the Package manager in Ubuntu, too.

Unlike Windows, there's a lot of excitement on the open source side of the fence, and for good reason. Distros like Fedora_7, Ubuntu, and PCLinuxOS are removing the traditional excuses why someone shouldn't reconsider Linux in their future, or right now, at least on a second machine for background tasks.

Something people need to know is what Paul writes about: the graphics are stunning, from the flexibility of Gnome to the artwork in Fedora_7. Mark Shuttleworth is one of the people making the planet a better place, and no matter which distro you use, we all owe the man.

JustAGuy 06/05/07 06:07:44 PM EDT

I'm also a Linux fan, I loved Debian, and Ubuntu is just superb... I'm also a DBA and Linux sysadmin, and I did some work on Windows. I use Windows mainly for Need for Speed. Saying things like "Security? pfff, it's Linux" is just plain stupid. I wonder how good sysadmin you are for having that attitude.

Bill 06/05/07 01:47:31 PM EDT

I recently installed Ubuntu on an old PC I had in my house. It never ran Windows well, it was always flakey, crashing every few hours. You couldn't leave it running overnight. With Ubuntu it's been running for weeks. I really like the ease of install and the fact everything is easy to setup and ready to go. The only tricky part was getting the Nvidia drivers for the ancient TNT2 card on it. All of the docs to do this were online, however.

h1 06/05/07 12:57:48 PM EDT

comparing Windows to Swiss cheese is a disgrace to Swiss cheese. The holes in Swiss cheese are meant to be there and, contrary to those in Windows, a sign of quality.

Buzz 06/04/07 02:10:37 PM EDT

My experience was very similar to the one described above! I was tired of dealing with Windows. I never really felt in control of the system, and resources were wasted on programs I never wanted running in the first place. Ubuntu makes life so much easier, and my computer runs much faster than it used to. I will never go back to the Windows realm for my everyday computing. I dual boot Ubuntu and XP strictly so I can continue to play several games I already own (mostly Blizzard titles), but to be honest, they are things I could live without. My life is centered on Linux now.

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