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SCO Claims Linux Lifted ELF

SCO Claims Linux Lifted ELF

SCO's two latest filings with the Utah district court hearing its $5 billion suit against IBM claim that SCO's Unix Executable and Linking Format (ELF) codes are in Linux illegally.

The charge was made by SCO VP of engineering Sandeep Gupta in a declaration that is currently under seal, but is quoted, albeit tersely, in the new filings.

If the ELF charge stands, SCO believes it would topple the whole Linux edifice.

ELF is like mortar to the operating system. Stripped out, all its applications would break. And, according to SCO spokesman Blake Stowell, it would not be something that the Linux community could simply rewrite, which is the Linux adherent's pat solution to SCO's infringement issues.

ELF is sorta like Microsoft's DLLs and was developed by AT&T's Unix System Labs as part of the Unix Application Binary Interface (ABI) before Unix was sold to Novell in 1993.

In 1995, the year Novell sold Unix to the Santa Cruz Operation, an industry group calling itself the Tool Interface Standard Committee (TISC) came up with a ELF 1.2 standard and to popularize it and streamline PC software development granted users a "non-exclusive, worldwide, royalty-free license" to the stuff, effectively putting it in the public domain, SCO says.

SCOsource chief Chris Sontag, the SCO VP in charge of the company's hate-inducing IP push, claims TISC, which folded immediately after the spec was published, exceeded its rights even though both Novell and the old SCO - as well as Microsoft, IBM and Intel - were on the committee.

Sontag also says that any entities that ignore SCO's ELF copyrights are infringing. Such a claim is likely to put SCO on a war footing, if it isn't already, with the Free Software Foundation, whose GNU operating environment makes broad use of ELF.

The Free Software Foundation is also the creator of the GPL, the viral license that makes Linux so provocative. SCO calls the GPL "quicksand" and claims it's invalid. IBM's countersuit against SCO claims SCO breached the GPL so the GPL could be tested in the court for a second, possibly definitive, time.

Where SCO is going to go with ELF is still up in the air, according to Sontag. It's still early days in fleshing out all its claims, he said.

SCO also claims "substantial similarity" between the Read-Copy-Update (RCU) routine in Linux 2.6.5 and Linux patches and SCO's copyrighted work, specifically SVR4.2 MP.

It thinks that Unix SMP 4.2 System V initialization (init) code was copied into Linux 2.6, that there's "substantial similarity" between the user level synchronization (ULS) routines in Linux and Unix, that its Unix System V IPC code was copied into Linux 2.4.20 and that copyrighted Unix header and interfaces were copied into Linux.

It also says the journaled file system (JFS) module from later versions of AIX, which SCO believes may derive from the JFS Unix, is in Linux 2.6. - MOG

More Stories By Maureen O'Gara

Maureen O'Gara the most read technology reporter for the past 20 years, is the Cloud Computing and Virtualization News Desk editor of SYS-CON Media. She is the publisher of famous "Billygrams" and the editor-in-chief of "Client/Server News" for more than a decade. One of the most respected technology reporters in the business, Maureen can be reached by email at maureen(at)sys-con.com or paperboy(at)g2news.com, and by phone at 516 759-7025. Twitter: @MaureenOGara

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Most Recent Comments
Ioan Coman 01/21/05 04:53:45 AM EST

I am an BSD Lover,
but am sorry for Linux

Check this:
http://linux.quicksurf.com/index.php?p=1278
http://www.computerworld.com/governmenttopics/government/legalissues/sto...
http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1759,1752775,00.asp?kc=EWRSS03119TX1K000...

Tim Wright 07/23/04 11:13:55 AM EDT

Hmmm... as Rob points out, my choice of language was rather poor. Yes, ELF is not strictly "derived" from COFF in that someone didn't just hack on the COFF code to produce ELF. However, the people responsible for the ELF format didn't start with a blank slate. They looked at COFF (and ECOFF etc. etc. etc.), worked out all the things that were wrong with it, then went and designed ELF. There are many things in common because they started with COFF as a baseline and to that extent, it is a derivative.

omg what FUD 07/23/04 07:09:43 AM EDT

As normal groklaw tells the real story.

http://www.groklaw.net/article.php?story=20040722135616439

linux world appears to be a waste of webspace.

martin yazdzik 07/22/04 10:24:32 PM EDT

Irrespective of all other factors, the predecessor in interest to SCO was party to TISC, and therefore laches applies.

Does SCO have no lawyers on their legal staff, or do they hope for judicial ignorance?

The game of "you dumbass judges don't know shit about coding and operating systems and won't never find out nothing about what high tech does" is over.

Either the ELF claim is true, in which case, laches requires dismissal, or it is not true, in which case, cursory examination will result in a summary dismissal.

Any other possibility requires corruption or stupidity on a monumental level.

I believe that even in good old Bouvier's, which anyone with apt-get can install with no dependency conflicts, even in 2004, culpable liability is still spellt culpable liability. Perhaps someone should send someone a sarge install cd?

Or lawyers should learn to read?

Best,
M

Jan Schermer 07/22/04 09:04:54 AM EDT

As far a I know, SCO released it's own Linux distribution (Caldera Linux) in the past *UNDER THE GPL LICENCE*...
got the point? They obviously do not :)

Btw if they want some licence fees from anyone, they must first (successfuly) sue every Linux distributor - because they all release it under GPL and anybody can base his rights (according to GPL) on any single release.

If they come to me (not very likely), they will first have to prove invalidity of all Linux distributions licences. Very unlikely.

Rob Poole 07/21/04 11:10:33 PM EDT

Fred Down wrote: "I did not state that DLLs and shared libraries are the same. They are similar in function."
I never said that you stated DLLs and shared libraries are the same. They are virtually identical in function, in fact. I was the one who equated the two. Any distinction between the two is, for the purposes of this discussion, hair splitting. The primary difference is that DLLs are specific to Windows, and "shared libraries" as I use the term, is rather generic. You seem to believe that the term "shared library" or "shared runtime library" is somehow specific to the UNIX/Linux world. Fine, whatever. DLL stands for Dynamic Link Library, and as such, means pretty much the same thing as "shared runtime library" or "shared library."

And yes, thank you, I've done Java programming for many years, and know full well that JNI is implemented with DLLs in the Windows world, and with shared libraries elsewhere. That's because these two mechanisms serve the same basic function, and therefore, Sun chose to use the mechanism appropriate to the target platform. Nothing new or exciting here.

I really don't care that your knowledge of ELF comes from practical experience. You said yourself that ELF was developed in part to address shortcomings of COFF, as a replacement for COFF. That would imply that ELF is legitimately a successor technology. I realize that you took exception to someone stating that ELF was derived from COFF; that would be similar to claiming that PNG is derived from GIF, which is untrue (although PNG was developed to replace GIF and improve upon it simultaneously -- I'm one of the PNG spec authors). So I understand your point, but you could have expressed it better -- and you could also acknowledge that, in part, the comment that you were taking exception to wasn't entirely off base in concept. ELF looks like PE, and both ELF and PE/PEF resemble COFF. There are no new ideas here.

"This detracts from my point that SCO by claiming ELF can seriously damage the Open Source."
It took me several read-throughs before I understood your meaning. A couple commas would help your sentence be more comprehensible. It should read "...SCO, by claiming ELF, can seriously damage..."

Your point is well taken. But that damage can only take place if SCO's claim can be substantiated, and that is far from a foregone conclusion.

"I find it strange that you find 'sorta' so upsetting but not comments like [...]"
I find "sorta" upsetting because professional journalists are not supposed to use such language in published news articles. I hold the journalist to a higher standard than the typical geek who posts a comment such as the one you cited. Your objection to the potty humor inherent in that comment is duly noted; however, the person who wrote that comment, while immature, was making a valid point. One easy way to detect bullsh*t and deflate specious arguments is to take someone's argument and substitute some nouns, and see if the same line of reasoning holds. In this case, the choice was crude -- someone chose to use feces in place of source code. The analogy is crude, and doesn't necessarily hold, but it does serve to point up the idiocy of SCO's claims by lampooning them in such an outrageous manner.

Eric Youngdale 07/21/04 04:45:25 PM EDT

Someone at SCO must be sniffing glue.

Merlyn 07/21/04 04:20:47 PM EDT

Microsoft scares me much more than SCO. I think the comments on http://www.cto-corner.com/pages/1/index.htm are a bit closer to the mark than any of us want to believe. MS eventually will patnent breathing, then what do we do?

Merlyn 07/21/04 04:16:38 PM EDT

I'm not as afraid of SCO as I am of Microsoft. I believe IBM, Novell and the community at large can handle SCO, but Microsoft is scary. Read the article at http://www.cto-corner.com/pages/1/index.htm. I think this guy is right on, Microsoft will patent breathing, then what do we do?

Fred Down 07/21/04 01:58:22 PM EDT

ELF was designed to replace COFF and COFFs various extended formats. One of the shortcomings of COFF was that there was no standard shared library mechanism. AIX at least AIX 4.3 still uses COFF (somewhat extended) and its shared libraries are therefore non standard. ELF addressed many other limitations of COFF.

I did not state that DLLs and shared libraries are the same. They are similar in function.

To illustrate what I mean. Java uses DLLs in Windows to implement JNI whereas on Solaris, Linux and various flavours of UNIX shared libraries are used.

My knowledge of ELF comes does not come from 'reading several technical articles’. It comes from converting COFF tools to work with both ELF and COFF formats. My source of information was Mary Lou Nohr Understanding ELF Object Files and Debugging Tools.

This detracts from my point that SCO by claiming ELF can seriously damage the Open Source.

I find it strange that you find 'sorta' so upsetting but not comments like "
All fecal releases I have seen are *substantially similar* to my fecal releases. I claim the shape/form/ip of all fecal releases as my own.
I demand that all SCO persons either pay me to crap , or STOP!"
But then I am not an English major.

Before anyone gets too excited I should declare that I had an aricle published in a magazine owned by IDG. I really have not received any payments from Microsoft.

Abigail Hergensheimer 07/21/04 01:11:16 PM EDT

Fred Down commented on 21 July 2004:

> SCO has a very powerful legal team which may be more relevant than the strength of its technical arguments.

SCO has a legal team with a powerful NAME. The actual quality of the legal work appears to be quite limited, with conflicting assertions in different courts and at different times. The IBM legal team has also engaged in some stiletto humor, clarifying the order of SCO's misnumbered pleading paragraphs, and offering other editorial "help".

It would really be quite funny if the whole thing weren't such an ugly demonstration of the problems with US civil litigation.

Uno Engborg 07/21/04 12:08:28 PM EDT

This type of anouncements doesn't seam to work anymore.
There are too many people that know the history to contradict them, and contradict them fast with high level of credibility.

A year ago this kind of story would have been cited all around the net and pumped the SCO stock to astronomic levels. Now, not even grooklaw that specializes in reporting from the SCO case mentions this sory and the SCO stock in almost free fall.

If you have a disposition for conspiracy theory, you could almost believe that people from the open source community publishes articles like this where they claim that SCO claims they own technology that is clearly not theirs, and by doing so reducing whatever little credibility SCO may have left.

Rob Poole 07/21/04 11:17:31 AM EDT

Fred Down wrote: "The case against SCO is not helped by childish ranting nor by berating journalists who do not write what you want to read."

Sir, it is not that people are berating the "journalist" in this case for writing what they do not want to read. It is that this "journalist" did little or no fact checking, obviously has a poor understanding of the technical matters at hand, and clearly slanted the article in SCO's favor. This is far from un-biased reporting of facts. Furthermore, the "journalist" who wrote this article did not adhere to standards and practices for journalism, such as the use of proper grammar and diction. "Sorta," for example, is considered unacceptable in professional discourse.

As to slanted writing, one need look no further than the mention of the GPL as a "viral" license (something that no self-respecting Linux publication should do, since Linux relies upon the GPL heavily; sadly, since Microsoft now owns the parent company of LinuxWorld, this sort of nonsense is expected). It's also clear from other word and grammar choices that the author clearly accepts SCO's claims at face value, not as the untested assertions they are. This is bias. While some bias is unavoidable in journalism, bias this blatant should be avoided. I don't think it's childish to demand better of a professional journalist.

Rob Poole 07/21/04 11:03:55 AM EDT

Regarding Fred Down's comments, I have two rebutting observations:

(1) The comparison between ELF and Microsoft's DLL's is in fact not valid at all, and if you had a grasp of basic deductive logic you'd realize this. Yes, ELF specifies "amongst other things" a standard mechanism for shared libraries. However, ELF's primary function (and this is the key) is to provide a format for binary executables in Linux. DLL's in Windows serve a single, very different function: they solely provide a binary format for shared libraries, and specify a mechanism for loading them at runtime.

In this regard, ELF more correctly maps onto COFF in Windows and a.out in the UNIX/Linux world, not to mention PEF (which I think was mainly a Mac thing). I very much remember the transition from a.out binaries to ELF binaries in Linux, incidentally. ELF may specify a mechanism for loading shared runtime libraries, but its functionality is a superset of the DLL mechanism in Windows, because ELF does so much more.

(2) You claim that ELF is not derived from COFF. Well, what you claim flies in the face of several technical articles that I've read regarding ELF. I'm willing to concede that the ELF implementation does not derive from any COFF-related source code. I'm also willing to concede that the ELF specification may not directly reference the COFF specification (something I can't check at the moment). But it's pretty well established that there are substantial similarities between ELF, COFF, and for that matter, PEF. The core underlying ideas were borrowed freely, as they should be -- why reinvent the wheel?

Mr. Down may earn his living developing for Linux, but he's not the only one. I don't do any kernel hacking these days, but I still write code professionally.

Fred Down 07/21/04 10:53:05 AM EDT

This ELF thing would be very serious, Linux depends heavily on shared libaries, back in the a.out days this was not true. If ELF had to be removed virtually all applications written since the a.out day would break.

More seriously ELF is used by BSD. I beleive it would not have been around when USL and BSD came to their settlement.

If SCO can stop both BSD and Linux then open source will suffer greatly.

My contingency plan should Linux be blocked was to switch to BSD.

SCO has a very powerful legal team which may be more relevant than the strength of its technical arguments.

The case against SCO is not helped by childish ranting nor by berating journalists who do not write what you want to read.

Ivor B. One 07/21/04 10:19:10 AM EDT

Seems like Linuxworld want technology editors. Time for some real linux advocacy on a psudo-linux site....

http://www.sys-con.com/careers/editor.cfm

Paul J R 07/21/04 09:55:08 AM EDT

Hey, linux moved to ELF from COFF (i think it was COFF), we can move again if need be!

Seems a bit rediculous though as the move to ELF came a long long time ago, surely thats going to make it pretty hard to prove a case based on ELF...

But, of course, my linux history knowledge is a little lacking on the ELF front, all i remember is the first time i compiled something as a shared object... that was a long long while ago

eric w 07/21/04 09:35:40 AM EDT

Matt T: Re: [IBM should just buy SCO and dissolve them.]

This was actually SCO's plan from day one... they wanted to be bought, esentially being paid to shut up, and the management gets a nice golden parachute... from which they float down into another company and do the same thing. If you read up on groklaw, you'll see that people such as Darl mcBride, Rob Enderle, etc. see lawsuits, frivolous claims, etc. as simply doing business.

By telling SCO to basically shove it, IBM immediately added legitimacy to the GPL, Linux, etc. You can bet that 90% of the media (read: SCO and Microsoft's mouthpiece) would have spun it as "Linux has IP issues, IBM pays off company to silence credible claims..." you get the idea. The idea of this is to silence this crap the first time around.

Oh yeah, and you don't threaten a company like IBM. They're 1) Huge, 2) Have enormous resources, and 3) possess a rabid army of lawyers. Don't forget...this company went through a large ordeal with the US government years ago.

Just my $0.02

Gogs 07/21/04 09:20:34 AM EDT

Oh for goodness' sake! There's no doubt that SCO's latest legal move is complete and utter nonsense, and fully deserving of all the invective it receives. The journalist that wrote the article however, is only guilty of not explaining things in a sufficiently technically accurate manner.

It seems these days that anyone who even WRITES about SCO gets the same amount of abuse as the company itself.

Focus people... FOCUS!!!!

fikus 07/21/04 08:30:16 AM EDT

everything can be replaced! code in linux can be replaced
by another code! SCO can be replaced by arsehole!

asdf 07/21/04 08:11:02 AM EDT

After reading that astonishly badly written, biased and obviously little-researched article, I was about to post regarding the completely unprofessional use of "sorta" and "the stuff". Then I saw that I wasn't the only one. Shame on your linuxworld for publishing this horrendous piece of "reporting"

Peter Simpson 07/21/04 07:44:36 AM EDT

A quick look at the standard in question at
(http://www.x86.org/ftp/manuals/tools/elf.pdf) reveals that:

1. Both Novell and The Santa Cruz Operation (old SCO) were members of the committee that wrote the standard.

2. "The TIS Committee grants...a non-exclusive, worldwide, royalty-free license to use the information disclosed in this Specification to make your software TIS-compliant..."

bioh 07/21/04 07:12:12 AM EDT

total garbage, first time reading an article on this site, and the last.

Zim Zalabim 07/21/04 05:57:43 AM EDT

M$ does own this site, I've even seen banner adds for visual studio .NET! on this site, so there you have it.

Linux world is just a FUD propaganda machine for M$

Gary Kemp 07/21/04 05:48:28 AM EDT

Matt T commented on 20 July 2004:
> IBM should just buy SCO and dissolve the company.
So that the next nuisance lawsuit can crop up?
No, SCO must be killed through the courts,
that would create a solid barrier against more
anti Linux lawsuits.
In addition, it would kill a lot of FUD out there.

Ajay Sinai Cuncoliencar 07/21/04 05:36:09 AM EDT

Sco is just trying to "create " IP infringements out of thin air .. now that its clear that nothing is going to harm the GPL movement. It looks like these are the last groans of a dying animal called SCO

hagarke 07/21/04 04:27:19 AM EDT

It's the time of the year .... everybody has to announce their numbers for the stock market.

SCO is just pumping them a bit for two weeks, then they can go back to their little nest and think of a new strategy to enervate then Linux community.

Give them a week, it'll pass away ....

Andy 07/21/04 01:33:03 AM EDT

Could just be a coincidence, but, as of right now, http://www.caldera.com/support/docs/openlinux/1.3/english/intro.html is giving a document not found. Google cache and archive.org have copies, though. :) *Save*

*Snip*
>their "succssors in interest" have been releasing ELF >support under the GPL for years: From >http://www.caldera.com/support/docs/openlinux/1.3/english/i>ntro.html
>"OpenLinux includes support for libc5, ELF, and a.out >binary formats."

Randall 07/20/04 11:33:50 PM EDT

Hmmmm... that's interesting. As pointed out in the link below, (which has a link to the published ELF specification dated MAY 1995, as well as a link to the Asset Purchase Agreement which wasn't signed until SEPTEMBER 1995.) OldSCO hadn't even bought ANYTHING from Novell yet, so how could NewSCO claim ELF at all? Evidently the "author" of this "article" did't even bother to do any fact checking, just regurgitated a steaming pile of lies. Nice work.

http://www.groklaw.net/comment.php?mode=display&sid=20040712104852353&ti...

jon 07/20/04 10:35:47 PM EDT

SCO makes me feel ashamed to live in Utah.

Stretch Cannon 07/20/04 10:29:48 PM EDT

Ummm, isn't linuxworld completely ignorable now because it's owned by IDG, a shameless paid Microsoft shill that doesn't really care much about facts or journalism because they are paid hacks? That was my understanding. Why are you all wasting your time here? There are real news sites out there.

Fred Down 07/20/04 10:22:31 PM EDT

I did some of the Elf work in SCO (the old one) Open Server.
I have 2 factual observations.

1 The comparison between ELF and Microsoft DLLs is quite valid. Elf defines amongst other things a standard mechanism for shared libraries. Shared libaries map closely onto DLLs

2 ELF is NOT derived from COFF. They are very different.

I earn my living developing on Linux, and have done for the last 7 years. I have found most of the comments on this discussion to be childish and would appear to be the work of wannabees who most likely have not written a line of professional code.

Matt T 07/20/04 10:16:56 PM EDT

IBM should just buy SCO and dissolve the company.

Andy Hoffman 07/20/04 09:59:15 PM EDT

Will someone PLEASE put a stop to SCO
these folks spend more time dreaming up ways to
hurt the FREE SOFTWARE FOUNDATION then they do
on creating new products. It is time for SCO to go
I hear there are several ways to build fertilizer
bombs. will somebody please park one of those vans
in the SCO parking lot so that this can all be done!!

Artiste Terroriste 07/20/04 09:52:37 PM EDT

Linuxworld,

Um... so this is why SCO has effectively told the Utah court, in filings you've obviously ignored....

1. SCO can't prove copyright infringement in Linux and thus can not refute IBM's 10th Counter Claim (IBM's use of Linux does not infringe... etc..). I'll let you look it up.

2. See 1, therefore they are requesting more discovery.

SCO had no TRUE allegations since day one, they don't know. All they had was a MS bankroll.

b4ses 07/20/04 09:31:45 PM EDT

just a comment

b4ses 07/20/04 09:31:03 PM EDT

-

Riddler 07/20/04 09:03:15 PM EDT

hmmmmmmm.... i dont know if i should cry or laugh. Is SCO out of business or the just dont know what to do with their time? They must be crazy. I still dont understand what was going through their minds. I think they enjoy wasting time and resources. They forget linux plays a major role in todays industry and so its not going to be easy get away with this crab they are trying to put up..............

Joe 07/20/04 08:55:48 PM EDT

Have you heard of RESEARCH? Perhaps you should do some before exposing us this type of crap.

Bill Fuller 07/20/04 08:53:42 PM EDT

This article is as lame and poorly written as SCO's legal documents. If you would bother to read more than SCO's self-serving press releases, you would notice they are trying like hell to avoid any mention of copyrights, and trying to change their stories in the different courts at every turn. Look for their first major butt-kicking tomorrow (7/20/04) when Daimler-Chrysler hands them their head in the hearing.

bullshit detector 07/20/04 08:46:09 PM EDT

This analogy between a virus and the GPL is completely false. A virus whether a computer virus or biological does not ask its host for consent when it invades. If a software developer includes a GPL'd work in their product, they are required to use a GPL compatible license. If they not do want to do so, then they can simply not incorporate the GPL'd work.
This issue of consent is the crucial difference.

Matt Easton 07/20/04 08:07:57 PM EDT

The GPL is just a license. If I run Windows 2000 Server, Microsoft wants my money. If I run Samba, the samba developers want to be sure that changes to samba that I make AND DISTRIBUTE will be available to improve samba. That's great for me, my colleagues down the street and also for my competitors who may be using samba. It's as though the samba developers aren't content to just give away great software-- they want to give me better software later. Is that what you mean by "viral"?

Dave Null 07/20/04 08:07:27 PM EDT

The TIS Committee grants you a non-exclusive, worldwide, royalty-free license to use the information disclosed in this Specification
to make your software TIS-compliant; no other license, express or implied, is granted or intended hereby.
The TIS Committee makes no warranty for the use of this standard.
THE TIS COMMITTEE SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESS AND IMPLIED, AND ALL LIABILITY, INCLUDING
CONSEQUENTIAL AND OTHER INDIRECT DAMAGES, FOR THE USE OF THESE SPECIFICATION AND THE INFORMATION
CONTAINED IN IT, INCLUDING LIABILITY FOR INFRINGEMENT OF ANY PROPRIETARY RIGHTS. THE TIS COMMITTEE
DOES NOT ASSUME ANY RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANY ERRORS THAT MAY APPEAR IN THE SPECIFICATION, NOR ANY
RESPONSIBILITY TO UPDATE THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THEM.
The TIS Committee retains the right to make changes to this specification at any time without notice.
IBM is a registered trademark and OS/2 is a trademark of International Business Machines Corporation.
The Intel logo is a registered trademark and i386 and Intel386 are trademarks of Intel Corporation and may be used only to identify
Intel products.
Microsoft, Microsoft C, MS, MS-DOS, Windows, and XENIX are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
Phoenix is a registered trademark of Phoenix Technologies, Ltd.
UNIX is a registered trademark in the United States and other countries, licensed exclusively through X/Open Company Limited.
* Other brands and names are the property of their respective owners.

Dreff PhD 07/20/04 08:05:23 PM EDT

I think that SCO is yet again talking out /dev/null. I guess they can, they own it... or so they claim.

JFS comes from OS/2 not AIX and even if it did, you can't taint IBM's invention of JFS by compiling it for UNIX.

ELF and ABI have already been shown to be untainted IIRC.

"viral" need only be applied to proprietary licences. If you see Microsoft's Shared Source you are tainted and any work you produce from that point forward is a potential theft of Microsoft's IP.

I'm just waiting for the day my eyes, when used in conjunction with my brain are considred a potentialli infringing technology. When coupled with my hands and my mouth they certainly are.

Cliff Williams 07/20/04 08:02:12 PM EDT

They are right you know. SCO did create it and Linux stole it. That's not all either. Linux stole the idea of executing code on x86 processors from SCO. Oh let's not forget using RAM, SCO had that one first too. As a matter of fact the hole idea of Linux is just a rip-off of SCO concepts and IP.. keyboards, monitors, harddrives, charachter devices... where will it stop?

ms lover 07/20/04 07:49:49 PM EDT

Hmmm, didnt groklaw do all the reports on the sco vs ibm case ?

also i thought journalism was supposed to be objective, so using "viral license" seems to me a subjective thing.

Stephen 07/20/04 06:42:38 PM EDT

Is it me or has Microsoft paid another person/company to do their bidding. The article makes any person that doesn't know enough about Linux or Unix believe that Linux is infringing upon SCO IP. Also the author of this article needs to go back to school. The wording of various sentances, the slanted view of the article and the odd words that are used (like "sorta") makes one bad article.

myql 07/20/04 06:37:08 PM EDT

All fecal releases I have seen are *substantially similar* to my fecal releases. I claim the shape/form/ip of all fecal releases as my own.
I demand that all SCO persons either pay me to crap , or STOP!

Doug Webb 07/20/04 06:20:05 PM EDT

Maureen O'Gara clearly has a tenuous grasp of computer technology amd zero understanding of copyright law. She also clearly does not check facts or statements for their veracity. In short, her drivel is not worth reading.

rand 07/20/04 06:18:35 PM EDT

SCO is/has been well aware of ELF in Linux: theyand their "succssors in interest" have been releasing ELF support under the GPL for years:
From http://www.caldera.com/support/docs/openlinux/1.3/english/intro.html
"OpenLinux includes support for libc5, ELF, and a.out binary formats."

@ThingsExpo Stories
SYS-CON Events announced today that Evatronix will exhibit at SYS-CON's 21st International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Evatronix SA offers comprehensive solutions in the design and implementation of electronic systems, in CAD / CAM deployment, and also is a designer and manufacturer of advanced 3D scanners for professional applications.
SYS-CON Events announced today that Synametrics Technologies will exhibit at SYS-CON's 22nd International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on June 5-7, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York, NY. Synametrics Technologies is a privately held company based in Plainsboro, New Jersey that has been providing solutions for the developer community since 1997. Based on the success of its initial product offerings such as WinSQL, Xeams, SynaMan and Syncrify, Synametrics continues to create and hone inn...
To get the most out of their data, successful companies are not focusing on queries and data lakes, they are actively integrating analytics into their operations with a data-first application development approach. Real-time adjustments to improve revenues, reduce costs, or mitigate risk rely on applications that minimize latency on a variety of data sources. In his session at @BigDataExpo, Jack Norris, Senior Vice President, Data and Applications at MapR Technologies, reviewed best practices to ...
"Digital transformation - what we knew about it in the past has been redefined. Automation is going to play such a huge role in that because the culture, the technology, and the business operations are being shifted now," stated Brian Boeggeman, VP of Alliances & Partnerships at Ayehu, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 21st Cloud Expo, held Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA.
"Evatronix provides design services to companies that need to integrate the IoT technology in their products but they don't necessarily have the expertise, knowledge and design team to do so," explained Adam Morawiec, VP of Business Development at Evatronix, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at @ThingsExpo, held Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA.
Smart cities have the potential to change our lives at so many levels for citizens: less pollution, reduced parking obstacles, better health, education and more energy savings. Real-time data streaming and the Internet of Things (IoT) possess the power to turn this vision into a reality. However, most organizations today are building their data infrastructure to focus solely on addressing immediate business needs vs. a platform capable of quickly adapting emerging technologies to address future ...
In his Opening Keynote at 21st Cloud Expo, John Considine, General Manager of IBM Cloud Infrastructure, led attendees through the exciting evolution of the cloud. He looked at this major disruption from the perspective of technology, business models, and what this means for enterprises of all sizes. John Considine is General Manager of Cloud Infrastructure Services at IBM. In that role he is responsible for leading IBM’s public cloud infrastructure including strategy, development, and offering m...
Product connectivity goes hand and hand these days with increased use of personal data. New IoT devices are becoming more personalized than ever before. In his session at 22nd Cloud Expo | DXWorld Expo, Nicolas Fierro, CEO of MIMIR Blockchain Solutions, will discuss how in order to protect your data and privacy, IoT applications need to embrace Blockchain technology for a new level of product security never before seen - or needed.
The 22nd International Cloud Expo | 1st DXWorld Expo has announced that its Call for Papers is open. Cloud Expo | DXWorld Expo, to be held June 5-7, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York, NY, brings together Cloud Computing, Digital Transformation, Big Data, Internet of Things, DevOps, Machine Learning and WebRTC to one location. With cloud computing driving a higher percentage of enterprise IT budgets every year, it becomes increasingly important to plant your flag in this fast-expanding busin...
Digital Transformation (DX) is not a "one-size-fits all" strategy. Each organization needs to develop its own unique, long-term DX plan. It must do so by realizing that we now live in a data-driven age, and that technologies such as Cloud Computing, Big Data, the IoT, Cognitive Computing, and Blockchain are only tools. In her general session at 21st Cloud Expo, Rebecca Wanta explained how the strategy must focus on DX and include a commitment from top management to create great IT jobs, monitor ...
Cloud Expo | DXWorld Expo have announced the conference tracks for Cloud Expo 2018. Cloud Expo will be held June 5-7, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York City, and November 6-8, 2018, at the Santa Clara Convention Center, Santa Clara, CA. Digital Transformation (DX) is a major focus with the introduction of DX Expo within the program. Successful transformation requires a laser focus on being data-driven and on using all the tools available that enable transformation if they plan to survive ov...
A strange thing is happening along the way to the Internet of Things, namely far too many devices to work with and manage. It has become clear that we'll need much higher efficiency user experiences that can allow us to more easily and scalably work with the thousands of devices that will soon be in each of our lives. Enter the conversational interface revolution, combining bots we can literally talk with, gesture to, and even direct with our thoughts, with embedded artificial intelligence, whic...
Recently, REAN Cloud built a digital concierge for a North Carolina hospital that had observed that most patient call button questions were repetitive. In addition, the paper-based process used to measure patient health metrics was laborious, not in real-time and sometimes error-prone. In their session at 21st Cloud Expo, Sean Finnerty, Executive Director, Practice Lead, Health Care & Life Science at REAN Cloud, and Dr. S.P.T. Krishnan, Principal Architect at REAN Cloud, discussed how they built...
Recently, WebRTC has a lot of eyes from market. The use cases of WebRTC are expanding - video chat, online education, online health care etc. Not only for human-to-human communication, but also IoT use cases such as machine to human use cases can be seen recently. One of the typical use-case is remote camera monitoring. With WebRTC, people can have interoperability and flexibility for deploying monitoring service. However, the benefit of WebRTC for IoT is not only its convenience and interopera...
With tough new regulations coming to Europe on data privacy in May 2018, Calligo will explain why in reality the effect is global and transforms how you consider critical data. EU GDPR fundamentally rewrites the rules for cloud, Big Data and IoT. In his session at 21st Cloud Expo, Adam Ryan, Vice President and General Manager EMEA at Calligo, examined the regulations and provided insight on how it affects technology, challenges the established rules and will usher in new levels of diligence arou...
No hype cycles or predictions of a gazillion things here. IoT is here. You get it. You know your business and have great ideas for a business transformation strategy. What comes next? Time to make it happen. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Jay Mason, an Associate Partner of Analytics, IoT & Cybersecurity at M&S Consulting, presented a step-by-step plan to develop your technology implementation strategy. He also discussed the evaluation of communication standards and IoT messaging protocols, data...
In his session at 21st Cloud Expo, Raju Shreewastava, founder of Big Data Trunk, provided a fun and simple way to introduce Machine Leaning to anyone and everyone. He solved a machine learning problem and demonstrated an easy way to be able to do machine learning without even coding. Raju Shreewastava is the founder of Big Data Trunk (www.BigDataTrunk.com), a Big Data Training and consulting firm with offices in the United States. He previously led the data warehouse/business intelligence and B...
Nordstrom is transforming the way that they do business and the cloud is the key to enabling speed and hyper personalized customer experiences. In his session at 21st Cloud Expo, Ken Schow, VP of Engineering at Nordstrom, discussed some of the key learnings and common pitfalls of large enterprises moving to the cloud. This includes strategies around choosing a cloud provider(s), architecture, and lessons learned. In addition, he covered some of the best practices for structured team migration an...
22nd International Cloud Expo, taking place June 5-7, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY, and co-located with the 1st DXWorld Expo will feature technical sessions from a rock star conference faculty and the leading industry players in the world. Cloud computing is now being embraced by a majority of enterprises of all sizes. Yesterday's debate about public vs. private has transformed into the reality of hybrid cloud: a recent survey shows that 74% of enterprises have a hybrid cloud ...
22nd International Cloud Expo, taking place June 5-7, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY, and co-located with the 1st DXWorld Expo will feature technical sessions from a rock star conference faculty and the leading industry players in the world. Cloud computing is now being embraced by a majority of enterprises of all sizes. Yesterday's debate about public vs. private has transformed into the reality of hybrid cloud: a recent survey shows that 74% of enterprises have a hybrid cloud ...